[:en]Evidence has shown that comprehensive sexuality education that is scientifically accurate, culturally and age-appropriate, gender-sensitive and life skill-based can provide young people with the knowledge, skills and efficacy to make informed decisions about their sexuality and lifestyle. Read more

[:en]Written and photos taken by Taban Robert Aggrey, journalists in Juba, South Sudan

‘Stigmatization is one of the leading factors discouraging young people from attending youth friendly health facilities’ said Dr. Victoria Achut, Director for the HIV Department, Ministry of Health South Sudan in her opening address during a journalist training workshop earlier this month.

Journalists in South Sudan will be utilizing their critical role in the community to break down detrimental barriers caused by stigma. A three-day training workshop, conducted by UNESCO, was hosted last week, 5-7 October 2015, in efforts to build greater knowledge among journalists on sexuality education. The training is the first of its kind, targeting broadcast media and radio personnel to develop scripts that will disseminate critical information to young people, parents, and communities across the country of South Sudan.

Stigma and discrimination hinder many young people from accessing crucial sexual and reproductive health care that they need. This includes receiving HIV testing and treatment, contraceptives and pregnancy care. Although the need to defuse stigma and discrimination is widely accepted across South Sudan and Eastern and Southern Africa, it is still prevalent in many communities.

Journalists in the workshop

Journalists in the workshop

Topics that will air on radio and broadcasting stations include healthy relationships, puberty and body reproduction, sexuality, gender and human rights, STIs and HIV/AIDS prevention, pregnancy and contraception, among others. There will also be further information linking young people to youth friendly centers that help them better access health supports and services they need.

“The Ministry of Health and South Sudan AIDs Commission are committed to addressing the issues of sexuality and HIV prevention especially among young people in and out of schools,” said Dr. Victoria.

She revealed that countries like Uganda, Kenya, Zambia, Botswana, Angola, and Zimbabwe have succeeded in establishing youth friendly centers – South Sudan will need to follow suit.

Dr. Victoria applauds the efforts of UNESCO and other development partners for trying hard to address the issues of stigma, ensuring every young person may practice their basic human right to sexual and reproductive health information and services.

Habib Dafalla, the Director General of Programme Coordination, South Sudan AIDS Commission (SSAC), said getting the media trained is one crucial way of helping to “crack down” on HIV prevalence in South Sudan. He further emphasized that journalists have an important role to play in sharing life-saving knowledge and skills to young people across the country.

Wishing the journalists good luck in their places of work. He urged to use the knowledge and skills they learned to have impactful coverage across the whole of South Sudan.[:pt]Written and photos taken by: Taban Robert Aggrey, journalists in Juba, South Sudan

‘Stigmatization is one of the leading factors discouraging young people from attending youth friendly health facilities’ said Dr. Victoria Achut, Director for the HIV Department, Ministry of Health South Sudan in her opening address during a journalist training workshop earlier this month.

Journalists in South Sudan will be utilising their critical role in the community to break down detrimental barriers caused by stigma. A three-day training workshop, conducted by UNESCO, was hosted last week, 5-7 October 2015, in efforts to build greater knowledge among journalists on sexuality education. The training is the first of its kind, targeting broadcast media and radio personnel to develop scripts that will disseminate critical information to young people, parents and communities across the country of South Sudan.

Stigma and discrimination hinders many young people from accessing crucial sexual and reproductive health care that they need. This includes receiving HIV testing and treatment, contraceptives and pregnancy care. Although the need to defuse stigma and discrimination is widely accepted across South Sudan and Eastern and Southern Africa, it is still prevalent across many communities.

Journalists in the workshop

Journalists in the workshop

Topics that will air on radio and broadcasting stations include healthy relationships, puberty and body reproduction, sexuality, gender and human rights, STIs and HIV/AIDS prevention, pregnancy and contraception, among others. There will also be further information linking young people to youth friendly centres that help them better access health supports and services they need.

“The Ministry of Health and South Sudan AIDs Commission are committed in addressing the issues of sexuality and HIV prevention especially among young people in and out of schools,” said Dr. Victoria.

She revealed that countries like Uganda, Kenya, Zambia, Botswana, Angola, and Zimbabwe have succeeded in establishing youth friendly centres – South Sudan will need to follow suit.

Dr. Victoria applauds the efforts of UNESCO and other development partners for trying hard to address the issues of stigma, ensuring every young person may practice their basic human right to sexual and reproductive health information and services.

Habib Dafalla, the Director General of Programme Coordination, South Sudan AIDS Commission (SSAC), said getting the media trained is one crucial way of helping to “crack down” on HIV prevalence in South Sudan. He further emphasized that journalists have an important role to play in sharing life-saving knowledge and skills to young people across the country.

Wishing the journalists good luck in their places of work. He urged to use the knowledge and skills they learned to have impactful coverage across the whole of South Sudan.[:fr]Written and photos taken by: Taban Robert Aggrey, journalists in Juba, South Sudan

‘Stigmatization is one of the leading factors discouraging young people from attending youth friendly health facilities’ said Dr. Victoria Achut, Director for the HIV Department, Ministry of Health South Sudan in her opening address during a journalist training workshop earlier this month.

Journalists in South Sudan will be utilising their critical role in the community to break down detrimental barriers caused by stigma. A three-day training workshop, conducted by UNESCO, was hosted last week, 5-7 October 2015, in efforts to build greater knowledge among journalists on sexuality education. The training is the first of its kind, targeting broadcast media and radio personnel to develop scripts that will disseminate critical information to young people, parents and communities across the country of South Sudan.

Stigma and discrimination hinders many young people from accessing crucial sexual and reproductive health care that they need. This includes receiving HIV testing and treatment, contraceptives and pregnancy care. Although the need to defuse stigma and discrimination is widely accepted across South Sudan and Eastern and Southern Africa, it is still prevalent across many communities.

Journalists in the workshop

Journalists in the workshop

Topics that will air on radio and broadcasting stations include healthy relationships, puberty and body reproduction, sexuality, gender and human rights, STIs and HIV/AIDS prevention, pregnancy and contraception, among others. There will also be further information linking young people to youth friendly centres that help them better access health supports and services they need.

“The Ministry of Health and South Sudan AIDs Commission are committed in addressing the issues of sexuality and HIV prevention especially among young people in and out of schools,” said Dr. Victoria.

She revealed that countries like Uganda, Kenya, Zambia, Botswana, Angola, and Zimbabwe have succeeded in establishing youth friendly centres – South Sudan will need to follow suit.

Dr. Victoria applauds the efforts of UNESCO and other development partners for trying hard to address the issues of stigma, ensuring every young person may practice their basic human right to sexual and reproductive health information and services.

Habib Dafalla, the Director General of Programme Coordination, South Sudan AIDS Commission (SSAC), said getting the media trained is one crucial way of helping to “crack down” on HIV prevalence in South Sudan. He further emphasized that journalists have an important role to play in sharing life-saving knowledge and skills to young people across the country.

Wishing the journalists good luck in their places of work. He urged to use the knowledge and skills they learned to have impactful coverage across the whole of South Sudan.[:]

[:en]Every girl has the right to be empowered to make safe and healthy decisions about their own lives. On October 11, we mark an important day in the year – International Day of the Girl Child.

Young girls and women across eastern and southern Africa still face many challenges in the region. Gender violence remains the most telling indicator of women’s lack of rights and agency. At least one in three women have experienced some form of gender violence over their lifetime (SADC Gender Progocol Barometer 2013). Teenage pregnancy has also shown vulnerabilities. By age 17, one in five young women in six of the countries in the region have become pregnant, causing increased school drop-outs and other detrimental social and economic consequences for girls. In addition, causes risks around their health such as birth complications and maternal mortality.

The Eastern and Southern Africa Commitment affirmed by ministers of education, health and other related sectors has focused on supports to ensure young women and girls are empowered and given a stronger voice. These are shown through targets that are expected to show progress both in 2015 and 2020. They include approaches such as:

  • Policies, frameworks and structures that fight against child marriage and gender-based violence.
  • Providing access to age appropriate, comprehensive sexuality education in and out of school so that girls have the tools and knowledge to protect themselves against early and unintended pregnancy, HIV/AIDS and STIs, and unhealthy or abusive relationships, among others. It also allows for young girls to understand and know their basic human rights.
  • Scale up access to youth-friendly health services at clinics, health facilities and other youth corners so young women and girls are given services in a non-judgemental and supportive matter. This includes recevign modern contraception, safe abortion (where legal), HIV/STI treatement and testing and pregnancy advice and care.

To learn more about the specific targets associated with girls and young people in the commitment, go to the ESA Commitment page.[:pt]Every girl has the right to be empowered to make safe and healthy decisions about their own lives. On October 11, we mark an important day in the year – International Day of the Girl Child.

Young girls and women across eastern and southern Africa still face many challenges in the region. Gender violence remains the most telling indicator of women’s lack of rights and agency. At least one in three women have experienced some form of gender violence over their lifetime (SADC Gender Progocol Barometer 2013). Teenage pregnancy has also shown vulnerabilities. By age 17, one in five young women in six of the countries in the region have become pregnant, causing increased school drop-outs and other detrimental social and economic consequences for girls. In addition, causes risks around their health such as birth complications and maternal mortality.

The Eastern and Southern Africa Commitment affirmed by ministers of education, health and other related sectors has focused on supports to ensure young women and girls are empowered and given a stronger voice. These are shown through targets that are expected to show progress both in 2015 and 2020. They include approaches such as:

  • Policies, frameworks and structures that fight against child marriage and gender-based violence.
  • Providing access to age appropriate, comprehensive sexuality education in and out of school so that girls have the tools and knowledge to protect themselves against early and unintended pregnancy, HIV/AIDS and STIs, and unhealthy or abusive relationships, among others. It also allows for young girls to understand and know their basic human rights.
  • Scale up access to youth-friendly health services at clinics, health facilities and other youth corners so young women and girls are given services in a non-judgemental and supportive matter. This includes recevign modern contraception, safe abortion (where legal), HIV/STI treatement and testing and pregnancy advice and care.

To learn more about the specific targets associated with girls and young people in the commitment, go to the ESA Commitment page.[:fr]Every girl has the right to be empowered to make safe and healthy decisions about their own lives. On October 11, we mark an important day in the year – International Day of the Girl Child.

Young girls and women across eastern and southern Africa still face many challenges in the region. Gender violence remains the most telling indicator of women’s lack of rights and agency. At least one in three women have experienced some form of gender violence over their lifetime (SADC Gender Progocol Barometer 2013). Teenage pregnancy has also shown vulnerabilities. By age 17, one in five young women in six of the countries in the region have become pregnant, causing increased school drop-outs and other detrimental social and economic consequences for girls. In addition, causes risks around their health such as birth complications and maternal mortality.

The Eastern and Southern Africa Commitment affirmed by ministers of education, health and other related sectors has focused on supports to ensure young women and girls are empowered and given a stronger voice. These are shown through targets that are expected to show progress both in 2015 and 2020. They include approaches such as:

  • Policies, frameworks and structures that fight against child marriage and gender-based violence.
  • Providing access to age appropriate, comprehensive sexuality education in and out of school so that girls have the tools and knowledge to protect themselves against early and unintended pregnancy, HIV/AIDS and STIs, and unhealthy or abusive relationships, among others. It also allows for young girls to understand and know their basic human rights.
  • Scale up access to youth-friendly health services at clinics, health facilities and other youth corners so young women and girls are given services in a non-judgemental and supportive matter. This includes recevign modern contraception, safe abortion (where legal), HIV/STI treatement and testing and pregnancy advice and care.

To learn more about the specific targets associated with girls and young people in the commitment, go to the ESA Commitment page.[:]