Posts

NEW YORK, 25 Nov 2019 – 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence is an annual global campaign designed to mobilise action to end gender-based violence (GBV) in all its forms. The campaign runs from 25 November to 10 December. School-related gender-based violence (SRGBV) is defined as ‘acts or threats of sexual, physical, or psychological violence occurring in and around schools, perpetrated as a result of gender norms and stereotypes and enforced by unequal power dynamics.’

Millions of children are affected by violence in and around schools every year. Girls are particularly vulnerable. SRGBV negatively impacts the ability of children to get to and from school, attendance rates, learning outcomes and can lead to higher rates of school drop-out. Identifying, responding to, and preventing SRGBV is therefore critical to advancing gender equality in education as well as the Sustainable Development Goal 4 target of ‘safe, inclusive and gender-sensitive learning environments.’ 

Developed by UNGEI through the Global Working Group to End SRGBV, our publication A Whole School Approach to prevent and respond to SRGBV: minimum standards and monitoring framework provides guidance for policy makers and practitioners in developing strategies to address school violence. The model is based on eight evidence-based standards drawn from approaches identified as promising practices for SRGBV prevention and response. Taken together, the following key elements represent a ‘whole school approach’ (WSA) to tackling SRGBV:

  1. Effective school leadership and community engagement to create safe, gender-sensitive learning environments
  2. Establishing and implementing a code of conduct
  3. Capacity building of teachers and educational staff support
  4. Empowering children on child rights, participation and gender equality
  5. Improving reporting, monitoring and accountability
  6. Incident response
  7. Strengthening safe and secure physical environments in and around schools
  8. Engaging parents

Over the course of this 16-day campaign UNGEI and partners will unpack each of these eight key elements through a digital advocacy campaign. Inspired by dialogue across digital channels and discussion fora, both in person and online, a global writeshop will be convened on Human Rights Day (10 Dec) leading to the creation of an open letter. Produced collaboratively, the letter will appeal to the countries of the world to take a number of key actions in order to make schools safe and gender-sensitive learning environments. Find out how you can take part here. 

The fight to end SRGBV must continue beyond these 16 Days. Therefore, marking a new phase of the campaign to #EndSRGBV, on 10 December UNGEI and partners will also release a series of six advocacy briefs featuring case studies on promising practice for tackling SRGBV. Each brief brings together the latest learning and evidence on how to prevent and respond to SRGBV, providing a framework for further advocacy, activism, and action against violence in schools.

Join us in learning how we can work together to address this global crisis, calling on global leaders to take action against School-Related Gender-Based Violence during this 16 Days of Activism and beyond. 

Follow UNGEI on Facebook and Twitter and join the conversation via #EndSRGBV 


15 June, 2018 – Harare, Zimbabwe
40 Master Trainers from Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Tanzania, as well as national partner, regional and global organisations,  have been involved in a workshop to adapt and pilot the Connect with Respect Tool in the four countries, aiming to end School-Related Gender Based Violence (SRGBV). The tool is a result of experience sharing by the Global Working Group to end SRGBV, with the partnership of UNESCO and UNGEI, sharing specific lessons from a classroom programme for early secondary school level entitled, Connect with Respect: Preventing gender‐based violence in schools that was developed for Asia and Pacific teachers to help them deal with SRGBV in their local context and to teach secondary grade students to understand the causes and effects of gender‐based violence, and thereby, to develop their skills for building respectful relationships.

The workshop that took place in Harare, Zimbabwe from 11 to 15 June 2018 came as a result of analysis and consultations on the situation of SRGBV in the ESA region in March 2017. Hosted by UNESCO, countries in the region examined entry points based on existing SRGBV prevention and response efforts within the education sector. In addition, activities in the Connect-With-Respect-Tool were reviewed within the context of East and Southern Africa, paving the way for the Master of Trainers workshop to pilot the tool in the region.

The workshop in Harare, Zimbabwe sought to provide an opportunity for education systems in the region to deploy a well‐developed, evidence informed resource for use in classroom prevention education, and for schools to participate in research trials, which will help to provide knowledge about impact and effectiveness. Particularly, the workshop aimed to:

  • Provide a tailored version of Connect-with-Respect tool,
  • Investigate whether Connect with Respect produces positive changes in knowledge, attitudes
    and behaviour,
  • Collect regional data on effective programming, informing future investments by the education
    systems in the prevention of SRGBV,
  • Develop the capacity of the region to deliver and evaluate educational programs, and
  • Encourage and enable education systems to provide SRGBV education to schools.

The workshop Master Trainers participating in the workshop included education officials and teacher training experts who are expected to work as multipliers by extending training and technical support to teachers, head teachers and district education officials in pilot schools on the Connect-with-Respect tool.

The workshop was delivered by trainers from the Graduate School of Education Youth Research Centre at the University of Melbourne, Australia, as well as from the four pilot countries. The training content focused on;

  • Understanding the patterns of GBV,
  • Raising Awareness about GBV,
  • Skills needed for positive gender relationships, and
  • Using a whole‐school approach to positive gender relations.

As follow-up, Ministries of Education (MoE) in the four piloting countries are expected to take the leading role in facilitating Connect with Respect trial activities. MoEs will work with UNESCO to identify their needs to meet all requirements of the pilot exercise.