Posts

We have another entry for the “Lockdown Diaries” blog series! The world has been hard hit by the Corona virus (COVID 19) in an unprecedented way so there is no better time to launch these guest bloggers to get an in-depth look at how young people from various corners of the East and Southern African region are handling quarantine, self isolation, social distancing and other preventative measures. You will follow their experiences through their eyes as young people – their thoughts, feelings, highs and lows, and reflections.

Stay tuned for more stories!

Written by Kelvin Kinuthia W. Kenya

What does the future hold? That’s a simple question that lingers in every young person’s mind. A question that acts as a drive in their day to day lives as they accomplish their ambitions. That being said, it is noteworthy that the hope for a better future is key to the productivity of the population. As simple as sounds  the question, ‘what does the future hold?’ the mystery behind it makes things more complicated. Especially during this COVID 19 pandemic period as it eats up into the mental health of all persons globally. The ramifications as we’ve witnessed in my community  witnessed are an increase in the rates of depression and anxiety cases. The worst case scenarios being a number of suicides and Gender Based Violence. The vulnerable cohort has been adversely affected, more so the disabled as ways to get basic needs and reliable information on COVID 19 keep shrinking. A heartbreaking increase in the number of teenage pregnancies has also been reported. When all this is fired up by the jobs lost, poverty and dreams lost the hope for a better future seems like a fairy tale.

With all these challenges facing my community, my schedule has been a beehive of activities aimed at reviving the much needed hope that appears to be lost. A description of my single day pretty much summarizes my life during this pandemic. As a trending saying goes, ‘every day is every day.’ Weird to say, but my everyday schedule is dubbed #MentalHealthCheckList.

My day starts at 5 AM. I am a member of the 5 AM club and have over the time managed to influence a number of young people from our estate to join. Our first hour of the day is composed of vigorous exercises and meditation. We do this together to act as each other’s accountability partner. Of course we observe the guidelines provided to prevent COVID 19 infection. We wash our hands, maintain distance and put on our masks. We take this time also to share our experiences during this pandemic. The 5 Am club has grown to be a well-functioning support group.

The remaining part of my morning is personal, to relax and carry out some chores. This is the time I use to exploit my God given talent to create content that creates awareness, educates and entertains on various life aspects especially mental health and COVID 19. The content is purposed to be posted on my social media platforms where I’ve built a brand as an actor, Viner , comedian and graphic designer. This therefore involves rigorous script writing, filming, creation of posters and video editing.

The actual sensitization happens in the afternoon as I post content on my social media platforms (inclusive of FB, Youtube, Instagram, TikTok and twitter. I then engage in the conversations being carried out by various organizations on the said social media platforms. I’ve grown fond of these discussions as I get a chance to share my ideas and also learn.

I and a team of young people from various Kenyan Universities also take time to lead such discussions on a health app dubbed RADA App. RADA App is health mobile app that we developed in conjunction with University of Nairobi and UNESCO. We extend our discussions to Facebook, Twitter and Watsap where we’ve built a community of young people and professionals ready to be activists of whatever  challenge that affects the society. The discussions have proved to be fruitful as young people are more aware of how to stay safe from COVID 19 and handle their mental health. One strategy that has proved useful is where we come up with thematic hashtags and raise dialogues around them. Our main areas of focus are COVID 19, mental health, Sexual and reproductive health, Gender Based Violence, nutrition among others. We’re champions for spreading reliable information from trusted sources on COVID 19.

Evening’s in the African culture are believed to be family time, especially currently as the Kenyan government has imposed a mandatory curfew from 7:00 pm. I took this positively and decided to not only spend time with my family, but also try expand the family. Evening’s for me therefore are spent establishing more personal conversations and interactions. ZOOM has proved a resourceful digital tool in this. I pass my sincere gratitude to the various organisations and professionals that have partnered with us in coming up with the themes of these discussions and moderate them. As a famous saying goes, ‘A problem shared is half solved.

I would therefore with sincere appreciation say that averagely I reach out to more than 2000 young people every day.

These comes with its challenges though. The most relatable one is waking up in the morning. It’s the rainy season and so the thought of waking up sometimes can be unbearable. However, just like I had stated earlier, we have accountability partners.

Moreover, reaching out to young people online is challenging since DATA for internet is expensive. To  add salt to the injury,  a limited number of young people have smart devices. We are therefore aware that as we sensitize there is a percentage of young people left out. This affects us also as the internet is not so strong from our area of operation and therefore keeps buffering  as we hold discussions. This sometimes lead to delay in between discussions which is disorderly and tiring. We are looking into our strategy to see how we can reach them.

Lastly as much as I use social media with good intentions, it can prove detrimental to my health. Addiction to social media is a potential threat to my mental health and well being. I therefore have to look for ways to moderate my exposure, which proves  hard since I strongly feel that the world needs me more than ever. I need to put myself out there and support young people in realizing that the future is as bright as we want it to be.

I call upon every young person to use every means available to reach out and offer a hand to a vulnerable soul. Together we can make through this. Together we can figure out what really it is that the future holds.

Lots of Love.

We’re excited to host young guest bloggers on the Young People Today site for the “Lockdown Diaries” blog series! The world has been hard hit by the Corona virus (COVID 19) in an unprecedented way so there is no better time to launch these guest bloggers to get an in-depth look at how young people from various corners of the East and Southern African region are handling quarantine, self isolation, social distancing and other preventative measures. You will follow their experiences through their eyes as young people – their thoughts, feelings, highs and lows, and reflections.

Stay tuned for their stories!

Written by Kariuki Mbuthia NAKURU, KENYA

Life has taken rather an unusual turn by the expectations of most people world over since the invasion of this formidable enemy that has rubbished most of the security global security measures. An enemy that is no respecter of national boundaries, international waters nor airspaces.It has ravaged through the globe and gluttonously claimed life indiscriminately and now normal is what we are craving for. But we can say that this has not completely taken us by surprise especially for the lovers of fiction movies like myself. I have watched quite a number of movies with apocalyptic themes. Top on my list is The last ship – a series that almost  depicts our current situation ,where the world ills from a pandemic that kills more than half the world’s population and the remnant remain in conflict between those who survived the disease due to natural immunity and those that never contracted the disease for they never got exposed. This clearly shows film makers had seen such a thing coming. It has also been said that the only revolution that was yet to happen was a biological revolution and here we are.

Talking of craving for the normal may seem like an understatement actually considering what it means. We all agree that we want to go back to our lives, to our routine. Having a well laid out plan for the whole day, whole week and consequently the whole year. The uncertainty that has befallen humanity is just too much a change. Ghost towns is the new normal that we have refused to come to terms with. The villages are no better!

In most African countries the villages are home to the elderly who can’t stomach the hustle and bustle of the urban settings and Kenya is no different. Just like many other students around the world I can’t be at school due to the obvious reasons –physical distancing which so far remains among the few weapons in our arsenal that are working against COVID-19. Furthermore schools must be available for the makeshift hospitals in case the worst comes to the worst and hospitals are overrun. Now I am in the village. In the first few days all I did all day long was following up the news in both local and international media .It was doing more harm than good! Within the first week of staying at home I had done some panic shopping because it seemed like lockdown was imminent  ironically it’s been more than a month now, all I had bought is spent and yet we haven’t gotten to that point. You see, that is what over consuming news can do! Making rush decisions and adding to the mental torture that most of us are already going through. Myself I have resulted to watching the prime time news only and keeping myself busy throughout the day. The onset of the long rains comes with a whole bee hive of activities in my place for it means the planting season. The past two weeks have been extremely busy for my mother, brother and I. We now have to do all the work by ourselves because farm hands are not very available. Most of them are not willing to move around working for the fear of contracting this virus.

It goes without saying that mistrust is all over especially in the villages where the old folk dwell. It is in the public domain that the virus is harsh to the elderly and they have all the reasons to be afraid considering what is happening in Europe with the aging population. To me this a blessing in disguise for it would be extremely difficult to deny my neighbours work and it would be even more difficult to exercise social distancing with workers around. With all this work I can now put my mind to rest and my muscles to work.

Yeah that is how it works here, with manual work the brain does so little! I don’t realize the passing of time either and without realizing it evening comes I eat, feed my dogs, watch some news that I seldom follow to the end before drifting off to slumber.

I never thought I would be able to appreciate this kind of life but you never know how strong you are until being strong is the only option you have, furthermore every cloud has a silver lining and it is not very wise to punish myself over things I have no control over. I have always wanted to plant trees in the farm and around the compound I realized this might just be the right time. With the rains here with us in plenty and lots of time to myself .I have just finished planting over a hundred trees .A hundred and five to be exact and another lot of a hundred and ten are waiting for more land to be prepared.

I have also had something for apiculture (Bee farming) for quite some time but I have been preoccupied and distracted by lots of other activities. I now have a single bee hive .I guess this project among other activities around here will keep me sane until the end of this pandemic. It is import for all the young people around the globe to use this time to execute those ideas they have been shelfing each other time for lack of time and avoid too much news. We should just do as we are instructed and all will be well. For some it might feel like house arrest but for others they see it as ample time to release pressure. Let us try be the latter. It is also very important to note that our mental health will be put to test during this trying time and if we do not be careful enough we might breakdown. “We might be apart but not alone” I know it’s almost a cliché now but doesn’t make it any less true. I believe this is the time to fortify oneself with tones of positive vibes. We have social media, let’s use it to remain connected share our greatest worries and hopes and we shall surely sail through and tell the story together post CORONA.

Harare, Zimbabwe – 24 October 2019: Over 2,000 students, teachers and civil society representatives  convened at the Makomo Primary School in the outskirts of Harare for the national launch of the “Let’s Talk!” Campaign on early and unintended pregnancy (EUP).

In attendance at the festive event were high level dignitaries and government officials including Amai Auxillia Mnangagwa, First Lady of Zimbabwe; Prof. Hubert Gijzen, UNESCO’s Regional Director for Southern Africa; Angelica Broman, First Secretary at the Swedish Embassy in Harare; the Ministers of Education, Health, and Provincial Affairs; and heads of UN agencies and NGOs.

As part of the ESA Ministerial commitment endorsed in December 2013, the “Let’s Talk!” Campaign aims to empower young people, especially girls, with the knowledge, information and support to prevent EUP.

Today we are launching the Lets Talk! Campaign on early and unintended pregnancy I want to recognise the young people, the learners present here in such large numbers this

[campaign]

is about you, this is about your future, your rights, and your lives said Prof. Gijzen.

The key message “let’s talk about pregnancy at the right time” was echoed through narratives of shared responsibility of families, communities, and institutions to address the root causes of EUP.

The Minister of Primary and Secondary Education, Prof. Paul Mavhima said that the “Let’s Talk!” Campaign is coming just at the right time when his ministry is implementing multiple interventions that respond directly to the plight of the girl child, most notably, the prioritisation of the Education Amendment Bill. He highlighted that among the Bill’s key provisions are efforts to outlaw all forms of discrimination in schools including on the basis of pregnancy. To this end, the Bill provides for all learners to have access to quality education after experiencing pregnancy.

For too long, when an adolescent becomes pregnant, we have pointed the finger at her. It is time that we pointed the finger at ourselves. If a girl gets pregnant that is because we have not provided her with the information, education, training and support she needs to prevent herself becoming pregnant, said Dr. Obadiah Moyo, Minister of Health and Child Care.

Adolescent pregnancy remains a major challenge and contributor to maternal and child mortality, fuelled by grinding poverty across rural and urban communities in Zimbabwe. Perinatal deaths are 50% higher among babies born to mothers under the age of 20 years and adolescent mothers are more likely to have underweight babies at risk of infections and death during the early stages of infancy.

The First Lady, Amai Auxillia Mnangagwa concluded the launch event by saying the Lets Talk campaign [is] an opportunity to amplify our actions  strategic partners [are] supporting the Governments efforts to ensure that the campaign reaches all parts of the country. Let us all amplify our voices against EUP in churches, schools, health centres, community meetings, workplaces and social spaces. Lets Talk! Pregnancy at the Right Time.  Lets Talk Health, Education and Rights for Pregnant Girls.

To learn more about the “Let’s Talk!” Campaign, please visit youngpeopletoday.org or follow us on twitter @ LetsTalkEUP

The African Youth and Adolescents Networking on Population and Development (AfriYAN) 2017 General Assembly and capacity building workshop for young people in Eastern and Southern Africa opens in Addis Ababa, Ethopia.

Drawing youth leaders from Eastern and Southern Africa, the General Assembly will run from the 7th to the 9th of November 2017 will usher in a new cohort of young leaders whilst bringing in renewed energy and robust innovation that will guide AfriYAN ESA to the next level of relevance, influence and accountability.

Under the guidance of UNFPA, Southern African AIDS Trust (SAT), UNESCO and other development and implementing partners, the General Assembly aims to foster the development of a better coordinated,managed and structured network that will further the mandate of AfriYAN ESA at regional and national level in the East and Southern Africa region.

[:en]

As part of efforts to ensure all young people have access to comprehensive, life-skills based sexuality education, UNESCO screened a new video at the 18-July Eastern and Southern Africa Commitment Progress Review Meeting, on the side-lines of this year’s International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. The video, ‘Being a Young Person’, looks at the challenges young people face as they navigate the journey to adulthood, and outlines how comprehensive sexuality education (CSE), can make this journey easier, more certain and healthier.

[:pt]An initiative that brings together policy makers, young people and civil society to strengthen sexuality education and reproductive and sexual health services in eastern and southern Africa. By having adequate access to these services, young people are empowered to make their own decisions about their health, preventing HIV/AIDS and unexpected pregnancies.[:fr]An initiative that brings together policy makers, young people and civil society to strengthen sexuality education and reproductive and sexual health services in eastern and southern Africa. By having adequate access to these services, young people are empowered to make their own decisions about their health, preventing HIV/AIDS and unexpected pregnancies.[:]

[:en]Evidence has shown that comprehensive sexuality education that is scientifically accurate, culturally and age-appropriate, gender-sensitive and life skill-based can provide young people with the knowledge, skills and efficacy to make informed decisions about their sexuality and lifestyle. Read more

[:en]Written and photos taken by Taban Robert Aggrey, journalists in Juba, South Sudan

‘Stigmatization is one of the leading factors discouraging young people from attending youth friendly health facilities’ said Dr. Victoria Achut, Director for the HIV Department, Ministry of Health South Sudan in her opening address during a journalist training workshop earlier this month.

Journalists in South Sudan will be utilizing their critical role in the community to break down detrimental barriers caused by stigma. A three-day training workshop, conducted by UNESCO, was hosted last week, 5-7 October 2015, in efforts to build greater knowledge among journalists on sexuality education. The training is the first of its kind, targeting broadcast media and radio personnel to develop scripts that will disseminate critical information to young people, parents, and communities across the country of South Sudan.

Stigma and discrimination hinder many young people from accessing crucial sexual and reproductive health care that they need. This includes receiving HIV testing and treatment, contraceptives and pregnancy care. Although the need to defuse stigma and discrimination is widely accepted across South Sudan and Eastern and Southern Africa, it is still prevalent in many communities.

Journalists in the workshop

Journalists in the workshop

Topics that will air on radio and broadcasting stations include healthy relationships, puberty and body reproduction, sexuality, gender and human rights, STIs and HIV/AIDS prevention, pregnancy and contraception, among others. There will also be further information linking young people to youth friendly centers that help them better access health supports and services they need.

“The Ministry of Health and South Sudan AIDs Commission are committed to addressing the issues of sexuality and HIV prevention especially among young people in and out of schools,” said Dr. Victoria.

She revealed that countries like Uganda, Kenya, Zambia, Botswana, Angola, and Zimbabwe have succeeded in establishing youth friendly centers – South Sudan will need to follow suit.

Dr. Victoria applauds the efforts of UNESCO and other development partners for trying hard to address the issues of stigma, ensuring every young person may practice their basic human right to sexual and reproductive health information and services.

Habib Dafalla, the Director General of Programme Coordination, South Sudan AIDS Commission (SSAC), said getting the media trained is one crucial way of helping to “crack down” on HIV prevalence in South Sudan. He further emphasized that journalists have an important role to play in sharing life-saving knowledge and skills to young people across the country.

Wishing the journalists good luck in their places of work. He urged to use the knowledge and skills they learned to have impactful coverage across the whole of South Sudan.[:pt]Written and photos taken by: Taban Robert Aggrey, journalists in Juba, South Sudan

‘Stigmatization is one of the leading factors discouraging young people from attending youth friendly health facilities’ said Dr. Victoria Achut, Director for the HIV Department, Ministry of Health South Sudan in her opening address during a journalist training workshop earlier this month.

Journalists in South Sudan will be utilising their critical role in the community to break down detrimental barriers caused by stigma. A three-day training workshop, conducted by UNESCO, was hosted last week, 5-7 October 2015, in efforts to build greater knowledge among journalists on sexuality education. The training is the first of its kind, targeting broadcast media and radio personnel to develop scripts that will disseminate critical information to young people, parents and communities across the country of South Sudan.

Stigma and discrimination hinders many young people from accessing crucial sexual and reproductive health care that they need. This includes receiving HIV testing and treatment, contraceptives and pregnancy care. Although the need to defuse stigma and discrimination is widely accepted across South Sudan and Eastern and Southern Africa, it is still prevalent across many communities.

Journalists in the workshop

Journalists in the workshop

Topics that will air on radio and broadcasting stations include healthy relationships, puberty and body reproduction, sexuality, gender and human rights, STIs and HIV/AIDS prevention, pregnancy and contraception, among others. There will also be further information linking young people to youth friendly centres that help them better access health supports and services they need.

“The Ministry of Health and South Sudan AIDs Commission are committed in addressing the issues of sexuality and HIV prevention especially among young people in and out of schools,” said Dr. Victoria.

She revealed that countries like Uganda, Kenya, Zambia, Botswana, Angola, and Zimbabwe have succeeded in establishing youth friendly centres – South Sudan will need to follow suit.

Dr. Victoria applauds the efforts of UNESCO and other development partners for trying hard to address the issues of stigma, ensuring every young person may practice their basic human right to sexual and reproductive health information and services.

Habib Dafalla, the Director General of Programme Coordination, South Sudan AIDS Commission (SSAC), said getting the media trained is one crucial way of helping to “crack down” on HIV prevalence in South Sudan. He further emphasized that journalists have an important role to play in sharing life-saving knowledge and skills to young people across the country.

Wishing the journalists good luck in their places of work. He urged to use the knowledge and skills they learned to have impactful coverage across the whole of South Sudan.[:fr]Written and photos taken by: Taban Robert Aggrey, journalists in Juba, South Sudan

‘Stigmatization is one of the leading factors discouraging young people from attending youth friendly health facilities’ said Dr. Victoria Achut, Director for the HIV Department, Ministry of Health South Sudan in her opening address during a journalist training workshop earlier this month.

Journalists in South Sudan will be utilising their critical role in the community to break down detrimental barriers caused by stigma. A three-day training workshop, conducted by UNESCO, was hosted last week, 5-7 October 2015, in efforts to build greater knowledge among journalists on sexuality education. The training is the first of its kind, targeting broadcast media and radio personnel to develop scripts that will disseminate critical information to young people, parents and communities across the country of South Sudan.

Stigma and discrimination hinders many young people from accessing crucial sexual and reproductive health care that they need. This includes receiving HIV testing and treatment, contraceptives and pregnancy care. Although the need to defuse stigma and discrimination is widely accepted across South Sudan and Eastern and Southern Africa, it is still prevalent across many communities.

Journalists in the workshop

Journalists in the workshop

Topics that will air on radio and broadcasting stations include healthy relationships, puberty and body reproduction, sexuality, gender and human rights, STIs and HIV/AIDS prevention, pregnancy and contraception, among others. There will also be further information linking young people to youth friendly centres that help them better access health supports and services they need.

“The Ministry of Health and South Sudan AIDs Commission are committed in addressing the issues of sexuality and HIV prevention especially among young people in and out of schools,” said Dr. Victoria.

She revealed that countries like Uganda, Kenya, Zambia, Botswana, Angola, and Zimbabwe have succeeded in establishing youth friendly centres – South Sudan will need to follow suit.

Dr. Victoria applauds the efforts of UNESCO and other development partners for trying hard to address the issues of stigma, ensuring every young person may practice their basic human right to sexual and reproductive health information and services.

Habib Dafalla, the Director General of Programme Coordination, South Sudan AIDS Commission (SSAC), said getting the media trained is one crucial way of helping to “crack down” on HIV prevalence in South Sudan. He further emphasized that journalists have an important role to play in sharing life-saving knowledge and skills to young people across the country.

Wishing the journalists good luck in their places of work. He urged to use the knowledge and skills they learned to have impactful coverage across the whole of South Sudan.[:]

[:en]Yesterday, on August 12, 2015, Young People Today teamed up with three amazing young people from across Eastern and Southern Africa for our first ever Twitter Takeover in honor of International Youth Day.

Kevin Karuga, Patrick Mwesigye, and Nyasha Sithole took over our @YPTCampaign Twitter account to chat about young people’s right to comprehensive sexuality education and adequate access to youth friendly health services in Eastern and Southern Africa. These passionate young people from Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe, respectfully, are all leaders in their regions and are advocates for change and the ESA Commitment.

In case you missed the takeover, you can check out some of the highlights in the Storify below. Young people were engaging in discussions around increasing access to youth-friendly health services and comprehensive sexuality education, as well as the need for civic engagement.

#YPTTakeover #YouthDay2015

A HUGE thank-you to Kevin, Patrick and Nyasha for their contributions, without their expertise, passion, and dedication, this takeover would not have been possible!

[:pt]Yesterday, on August 12, 2015, Young People Today teamed up with three amazing young people from across Eastern and Southern Africa for our first ever Twitter Takeover in honour of International Youth Day.

Kevin Karuga, Patrick Mwesigye and Nyasha Sithole took over our @YPTCampaign Twitter account to chat about young people’s right to comprehensive sexuality education and adequate access to youth friendly health services in Eastern and Southern Africa. These passionate young people from Kenya, Uganda and Zimbabwe, respectfully, are all leaders in their regions and are advocates for change and the ESA Commitment.

In case you missed the takeover, you can check out some of the highlights in the Storify below. Young people were engaging in discussions around increasing access to youth-friendly health services and comprehensive sexuality education, as well as the need for civic engagement.

#YPTTakeover #YouthDay2015

A HUGE thank-you to Kevin, Patrick and Nyasha for their contributions, without their expertise, passion and dedication, this takeover would not have been possible!

[:fr]Hier,  12 Août, 2015, l’initiative « Les Jeunes aujourd’hui » a fait équipe avec trois jeunes extraordinaires venant de l’Afrique orientale et australe pour notre début  onTwitter en l’honneur de la Journée Internationale de la Jeunesse.

Kevin Karuga, Patrick Mwesigye et Nyasha Sithole ont pris la gestion de la @YPTCampaign sur notre compte Twitter pour discuter du droit des jeunes à l’éducation sexuelle et à l’accès adéquat aux services de santé adaptés aux jeunes en  Afrique orientale et australe. Ces jeunes passionnés du Kenya, de l’Ouganda et du Zimbabwe sont tous des leaders dans leurs régions et plaident pour un changement et pour l’Engagement ministériel de l’AOA.

Si vous avez manqué cette début, vous pouvez vérifier certains des points saillants de la Storify ci-dessous. Les jeunes ont engagé des discussions autour de l’accès aux services de santé adaptés aux jeunes et à l’éducation sexuelle, ainsi que sur la nécessité de l’engagement civique.

#YPTTakeover #YouthDay2015 #JournéeDeLaJeunesse2015

Un ENORME merci à Kevin, Patrick et Nyasha pour leurs contributions. Sans leur expertise, leur passion et leur dévouement, cela n’aurait pas été possible !

[:]

[:en]Today marks World AIDS Day. Every year, December 1st is dedicated to raising awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection.

According to UNICEF there were 2.1 million adolescents (10–19 years) living with HIV in 2013, 80% of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa, and many of whom still do not know their HIV status.

We believe  that young people deserve adequate information and health services to prevent the spread of HIV. Take a stand today and help us spread the word![:pt]Hoje é marcado o Dia Mundial da SIDA. Todos os anos, o dia 1 de dezembro é dedicado a sensibilizar as pessoas para a pandemia da SIDA causada pela propagação da infeção do VIH.

Segundo a UNICEF havia 2.5 milhões de adolescentes (10-19 anos) a viver com o VIH em 2013, 80% dos quais vivem na África subsaariana, e muitos dos quais ainda não sabem do seu estatuto de portadores de VIH.

Acreditamos que os jovens merecem informações e serviços de saúde adequados para prevenir a propagação do VIH. Manifeste-se hoje e ajude-nos a espalhar a mensagem![:fr]Aujourd’hui est un jour marqué par la Journée Mondiale du Sida. Chaque année, le 1er Décembre est consacré à la sensibilisation à la pandémie du sida causée par la propagation de l’infection au VIH.

Selon l’UNICEF, il y avait 2,1 millions d’adolescents (10-19 ans) atteints du VIH en 2013, dont 80% vivant en Afrique sub-saharienne, et beaucoup d’entre eux ne connaissent toujours pas leur statut de séropositif.

Nous croyons que les jeunes méritent des services adéquats d’information et de santé pour prévenir la propagation du VIH. Prenez position aujourd’hui et aidez- nous à faire passer le message.[:]

[:en]Every girl has the right to complete a quality education – however, the realities are that many do not make it through to their graduation. Teenage pregnancy is a significant cause to increased school dropout, with persistently high rates across Eastern and Southern Africa exceeding two times the global average.

A consultation held in Johannesburg, South Africa from 4-5 November 2014, discusses the key role education plays in eliminating high numbers of unintended teenage pregnancy. The event brings together representatives from Ministries of Education, Ministries of Health, UN and bilateral partners, civil society organizations and research partners from across Eastern and Southern Africa.

In addition to the increased health risks, young girls who become pregnant face difficult choices with life-long consequences. It could mean expulsion from home and school; being shamed and stigmatized by family, community members and peers; increased vulnerability to violence and abuse, or greater poverty and economic hardship.

In order to combat early and unintended pregnancy, strengthening the education sector – at all levels – is crucial. Not only does education help in preventing early and unintended pregnancy but also to ensure all women and girls receive full access to the education they deserve.

Jointly organized by UNESCO, UNFPA, Ford Foundation and Population Council (Kenya), one of the major outcomes of the consultation has been the development of a regional report on the education sector’s response for eliminating early and unintended pregnancy across Eastern and Southern Africa.[:pt]Todas as raparigas têm o direito de completar uma educação de qualidade – porém, a realidade é que muitas não chegam a se formar. A gravidez de adolescentes é uma causa significativa do aumento do abandono escolar, com taxas altas persistentes em toda África Oriental e Austral excedendo duas vezes a media global.

Uma consulta realizada em Joanesburgo, África do Sul de 4-5 de novembro de 2014, discute o papel importante que a educação desempenha em eliminar os altos números de gravidezes não intencionadas de adolescentes. O evento junta representantes dos Ministérios da Educação e da Saúde, da UN e dos parceiros bilaterais, das organizações de sociedades civis e parceiros de pesquisa de toda a África Oriental e Austral.

Para além do aumento dos riscos de saúde, raparigas jovens que ficam grávidas enfrentam escolhas difíceis com consequências para o resto da vida. Pode significar serem expulsas de casa e da escola; serem envergonhadas e estigmatizadas pela família, membros da comunidade e colegas; aumento da vulnerabilidade à violência e ao abuso, ou pobreza maior e dificuldades económicas.

Para combater a gravidez precoce e não intencionada, reforçar o setor da educação – a todos os níveis – é fundamental. A educação não só ajuda a prevenir a gravidez precoce e não intencionada mas também ajuda a assegurar que todas as mulheres e raparigas recebam acesso completo à educação que merecem.

Conjuntamente organizada pela UNESCO, UNFPA, Ford Foundation e Population Council (Quénia), um dos maiores resultados da consulta foi o desenvolvimento de um relatório regional sobre as repostas do setor da educação para eliminar a gravidez não intencionada por toda a África Oriental e Austral.[:fr]Chaque fille a le droit de compléter une éducation de qualité. Cependant, la réalité est que beaucoup n’arrivent pas jusqu’à la fin de leur études. La grossesse des adolescentes est une cause importante de l’augmentation de l’abandon scolaire, avec la persistance de taux élevés dans toute l’Afrique Orientale et Australe, dépassant deux fois la moyenne mondiale.

Une consultation a eu lieu à Johannesburg, en Afrique du Sud les 4 et 5 Novembre 2014, afin d’examiner le rôle clé que joue l’éducation dans l’élimination du nombre élevé de grossesses non-désirées chez les adolescentes. L’événement a réuni des représentants des ministères de l’Éducation, des ministères de la Santé, de l’ONU et des partenaires bilatéraux, des organisations de la société civile et des partenaires de recherche de toute l’Afrique Orientale et Australe.

En plus des risques accrus pour la santé, les jeunes filles qui deviennent enceintes doivent faire des choix difficiles qui entraînent des conséquences tout au long de leur vie. Cela peut entrainer l’expulsion de leur maison et l’école; l’humiliation et la stigmatisation par la famille, les membres de la communauté et les pairs; l’augmentation de la vulnérabilité à la violence et aux abus, ou une plus grande pauvreté et des difficultés économiques.

Afin de lutter contre les grossesses précoces et non désirées, le renforcement du secteur de l’éducation – à tous les niveaux – est crucial. Non seulement l’éducation aide dans la prévention des grossesses précoces et non-désirées, mais aussi elle assure que toutes les femmes et les filles bénéficient d’un accès à l’éducation complète qu’elles méritent.

Organisée conjointement par l’UNESCO, le FNUAP, la Fondation Ford et le Conseil de la Population (Kenya),  la Consultation a eu, comme un des principaux résultats, l’élaboration d’un rapport régional sur la réponse du secteur de l’éducation pour l’élimination précoce des grossesses non désirées à travers l’Afrique orientale et australe.[:]